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George Fox College 
Archives ^ 



The Crescent 



VOLUME XXXV 



NEWBERG, OREGON, NOVEMBER 28, 1923 



NUMBER 2 



J 



PACIFIC WINS EASILY 
FROM MONMOUTH TEAM 

Quakers Make Yardage at Will, Out- 
classing Teachers in All Phases 



EDMUND VANCE COOKE, POET AND 
LECTURER, PLEASES AUDIENCE 

Second Number at Lyceum Course is 
Splendid Piece of Work 



The game started with Pacific 
kicking off to Monmouth. Immedi- 
ately Monmouth punted the ball 
back so that it was our ball on the 
50 yd. line. The game was just 
four minutes old when Swak made 
the first touchdown. It was an off 
tackle smash and he made 45 yds., 
using a successful stiff arm on three 
Monmouth men who attempted to 
stop him. 

P. C. kicked off to Monmouth 
again but they were held for downs. 
Dick made a right end run for 30 : 
yds, but due to an offside, the ball , 
was brought back with a five yard , 
penalty. On the next down P. C. j 
was penalized again for offside, so 
we punted on the fourth down. Back 
on their 20 yard line our fast man, 1 
Phil Haworth, caught the man in j 
his tracks. ] 

The second quarter opened with , 
our ball on their fifteen yd. line, i 
We lost the ball through a fumble. I 
They made a forward pass which was 
caught by Dick Everest, who ran 
70 yds. for a touchdown. 

Again the ball was started by P. 
C. kicking to Monmouth. They made 
their yardage several times by line 
smashing which was successful be- [ 
cause they used a formation new to 
our men. Regular five yard progress j 
on each down was made until Leon-j 
ard skillfully worked out a plan to 
break' them. Shortly after this Swak 
got a fumbled ball and made a 35 
yard dash, but was stopped by a neck- 
tie tackle which looked for a moment 
like it would lay him out. However, 
the other man found he had struck 
a stone wall when he hit that neck. 

We made our full yardage on the 
fourth down when Gus Hanke caught 
a forward pass. This put us on 
their five yard line. Two downs put 
us about one yard to go and in the 
third down Capt. Sanders put the 
ball across for his first touchdown 
this season. It is noticeable that 
Capt. Sanders always works for the 
best results fo his team regardless 
of opportunity for personal glory 
which many quarterbacks take ad- 
vantage of. 

In the third quaiter no scoring 
was done. Things looked evenly 
matched until Nordyke came in with 
a couple of brilliant tackles and also 
broke up Monmouth's forward pass- 
ing. 

The fourth touchdown was made 
in the fourth quarter by Dick Everest 
when he caught a forward from San- 
ders. Shortly following this and just 
before whistle blew for time our 
fifth touchdown was made by an- 
other forward pass from Sanders to 
Dick who ran 25 yds. for another 
touchdown. 

During the game P. C. boys lost 
125 yds. in penalties besides about 
100 yds. more which were forfeited 
on account of Ihe penalties. The 
game was an offensive game for P. C. 
which gave the back field lots of 

(Continued on page four) 



Lyceum stock went considerably 
above par in the estimation of those 
who heard Edmund Vance Cooke, 
present "Is Poetry Important," from 
his own writings, at the College 
chapel Monday evening, Nov. 26. 

Mr. Cooke's program was divided 
under the sub-heads of "Impertinent 
Inquiries," "Little Tot Lyrics" "The 
Family Group," "Fragments of Phil- 
osophy," Rimes of Religion," and 
"The Larger Nationalism." 

All of Mr. Cooke's program was 
given from his own writings and 
touched on many phases of life. 
Among the most interesting and en- 
tertaining numbers from the var- 
ious sub-heads were: "Don't You," 
"Desire," "At The Concert," "Some- 
body Calls it Home," "Unverstaen- 
dlich," "How Did You Die," "Yours" 
and "Each for All." 

"Mother goes a-marching" was 
strictly modern and up-to-date; with 
a fine strain of humor, and a deeper 
meaning touching upon the woman's 
sufferage movement. While paying 
a high tribute to mother the lecturer 
did not entirely slight father, saying 
that he was no slouch either in the 
affairs of life; as a poem entitled 
"Father" fully illustrated. "Why de 
Debbil" was a very humorous, selec- 
tion in which the colored man won- 
dered why the Lord made the Devil 
and then permitted him to live, al- 
ways working havoc. 

"The Uncommon Commoner," was 
the closing number, and a splendid 
tribute to Lincoln. In all, the lec- 
ture was a splendid entertainment 
and full of thoughtful suggestions 
as to some of life's problems. Let 
us hope that Mr. Cooke may pay 
Newberg another visit before many 
years have gone. 



FENW1CK- NEWELL COMPANY 
DELIGHTS LYCEUM AUDIENCE 



NCE r i 



Concert Believed to be Equal of Any 
Heard in Newberg 

In the opinion of many who were 
present, the concert given by the 
Fen wick Newell Concert Company 
November 16, was one of the most 
successful ever presented in New- 
berg. There was a good attendance 
and everyone felt thai they were 
well rewarded by the program which 
included grand opera and light opera 
as well as lighter selections. 

Mr. Newell has a tenor voice of 
unusual sweetness and clarity and 
greatly pleased the audience with hi.i 
songs. One of the numbers that best 
pleased his hearers and showed Mr. 
Newell's fine skill was Bamberg's 
"II Niege." The duet from Madame 
Butterfly, "O Quant Orchi Tisl," 
given by Mr. Newell and Marguerite 
Holt, soprano, was also greatly ap- 
preciated. 

Joseph Marks, violinist, rivaled 
Mr. Newell in popularity with his 
splendid violin selections and was 
repeatedly encored. His interpreta- 
tion of the "live mana," and Drala'r. 
Serenade was especially well liked. 
Miss Crawford, the pianist, also won 
the audience by her skillful playing. 

The closing number the Good 
Night song from Martha proved very 
effectual. 



STUDENT VOLUNTEERS 

A special joint meeting of the Y. 
M. and Y. W. was held Tuesday, 
Nov. 20, to choose delegates to the 
Ninth Annual Student Volunteer 
Convention at Indianapolis, Decem- 
ber 28 to January 1. Florence Lee, 
Hubert Armstrong and Miss Lewis 
were chosen as our delegates. 

The purpose of the convention is 
to emphasize the solidarity of man- 
kind and the Interdependence of all 
nations and races. It also wishes 
to help realize the critical needs and 
possibilities of the world today and 
to consider the responsibility of the 
Christian students of the United 
States and Canada in the light of 
this situation. Addresses on themes 
of universal interest, discussion 
groups and formus and groups meet- 
ings will present many opportunities 
to those who attend . 

Among the college students at- 
tending the opening concert of the 
Portland Symphrny Orchestra at 
Portland, Nov .16, were Florence 
Heater, Eva Miles, Delight Carter, 
Virgil Hinshaw, Royal Gettman and 
Hubert Armstrong. 



FOOTBALL BANQUET 

Coach Michener showed his ap- 
preciation of the work done by the 
football squad by giving it a ban- 
quet Saturday evening, Nov. 24. 

The table was laid diagonally 
across the library and provided 
ample accomodation for the twenty 
men present. A blue and gold 
streamer ran the length of the table 
j and the football that has gone 
through our gridiron battles rested 
in the center. The room was dec- 
orated with chrysanthemums. Place 
cards were made of paper footballs. 
The courses were distinctively foot- 
ball in character as may be noted 
in the menu following. 

Kick-off Cocktail 
Old Rivals Meat Drop Kick Potatoes 
Line Smash Squash P. C. Beets 
End Run Salad with two yard penalty 

"Time Out" Drinks 
Touch Down Pie Final Cheer Mints 
Toast Program 

Toast Master Coach Michener 

The Line Gus Hanke 

The Backfield .... Hubert Armstrong 

The Signals Capt. Bill Sanders 

Shekels Manager Spud Everest 

Boosters Doctor Hester 

The Goal C. L. Conover 

The P. C. girl serenaders gather- 
ed on the campus in front of the 
banquet room and favored the feast 
ers with college pep songs. 

Pacific College football season was 
formaly brought to a close by this 
banquet. This year's season, al- 
though not as successful as it might 
have been in games won, was, how- 
ever, eminently successful in ex- 
perience gained and we hope that 

(Continued on page four) 



NFIELD TAKES HARD 
GAME FROM PACIFIC 

Baptists Live Up to Reputation, 
Proving Better on Wet Fields 

The last football game of the sea- 
son was played with Linfield college 
Friday, November 23. The game 
was played on one of the wettest 
days and muddiest fields in the 
memory of the oldest old-timer. 
Nevertheless a big bunch of spectat- 
ors enthusiastically ate peanuts and 
cheered the teams and everyone al- 
most forgot the sea of mud and 
water. 

The game started by Linfield kick- 
ing to P. C. The first quarter was 
spent punting the ball back and 
forth. When the first down was 
called we were on our 35 yard line; 
at the end of the quarter Linfield 
had the ball on our 30 yard line. 

In the 2nd quarter it looked like 
luck was going to favor us when 
Spud fell on a fumbled ball on our 
15 yard line. We attempted to punt 
a slick ball it shot off to the right 
and out of bounces Linfield was 
pushed back only 5 yards. From 
here Linfield carried the ball right 
through in 5 downs to a score. They 
were successful in their goal kick. 

Pacific kicked off to Linfield and 
Ralph Hester caught the ball on 
the 32 yard line. Bill intercepted 
a Linfield forward pass and was 
stopped on our 47 yard line. We 
punted the ball to their 20 yard 
line. Ralph got it from them on a 
fumble. It looked like it would be 
a tied score but the half ended too 
soon. 

The 2nd half started with the 
kick off by P. C. which Linfield 
caught on the 30 yard line. After 
a few plays Spud broke through their 
line and by a splendid tackle push- 
ed them back far enough so that 
they lost the ball to us on their 30 
yard line. Linfield fell on a fumbled 
ball, but failed to make their downs. 
In a punt our safety expected the 
ball to go over the line and be car- 
ried back to 20 yards, but instead 
because of its water soaked condi- 
tion, it failad to roll across which 
gave us the ball on our 1 yard line. 
In an attempt to punt the ball they 
broke through our line and fell on 
Swak for a touch back, scoring 2 
more points for them. The quarter 
was called. 

Fourth quarter opened with the 
ball put back in play on the 20 
yard line with P. C. holding it. 
The ball see-sawed back and forth 
until the last of the quarter when 
Linfield put it across for another 
touch down and goal kick. The 
final whistle came about two minutes 
later with the score 16 to nothing 
in favor of Linfield. 

The kind of weather we had need 
not be mentioned to Oregonians. 
The boys fought hard the game 
through. They greatly appreciated 
a loyal student body who backed 
them from under their umbrellas. 
George Mulltnger forgot Linfield 
men never carried umbrellas so he 

(Continued on page two) 



THE CRESCENT 



Entered as second-class mall matter 
at Postoffice at Newberg, Ore. j 

Published Semi-Monthly during ' 
the college year by the Student i 
Body of Pacific College, Newberg, 1 
Oregon. j 

Ben Darling Editor-in-Chief 

Iris Hewitt Associate Editor 

Florence Lee Society Editor 

Hubert Armstrong. .. .Sports Editor 1 

Ralph Hester Business Manager ' 

Ivar Jones Circulation Manager 

Reporters — Retha Tucker, Rose 
Ellen ' Hale, Marie Hester, Hulda 
Winslow, Wendell Woodward, Royal 
Gettman and Dwight Michener. 

Terms: J1.00 the Year in Advance, j 
Single Copy 10c. 

OUE THANKSGIVING 

Thanksgiving comes, turning long 
anticipated vacations, feasts and 
frolics into realities. In the begin- 
ning Thanksgiving had its inception 
in the free exercise of liberty, not 
so much in what its originators 
possessed, but in what they had to 
do. Those first strong hearted set- 
tlers on the eastern coast, had few 
comforts in a physical sense, but 
the chains of an unjust system had 
been shaken from their lives, and a 
vast new world with all its golden 
opportunity lay before them. And 
for that they were thankful. 

In no less sense should we be 
thankful. The bitter discomforts of 
that first Thanksgiving Day are ab- 
sent from most of our lives, but, 
there are still wrongs to be righted, 
and new worlds to conquer, with 
the same golden opportunities lying 
in the future, as there were in olden 
days. Yes, we have even greater 
things to be thankful for. 



is a task of which the difficulties 
are only appreciated by those who 
have been responsible for its ap- 
pearance. It is a matter requiring 
earnest cooperation by the entire 
student body if the paper is to be 
truly representative of the school 
life. 

We hope henceforth, that the 
Crescent will appear regularly but 
that can only be assured by the 
prompt and hearty cooperation of 
staff and student body. 



HELP YOURSELF 

Recently a young upperclassman 
in a state university expressed his 
dissatisfaction with his course and 
the methods used by his instructors 
in teaching the course. A smaller 
college had, said the student, given 
far better results in the Imparting 
of knowledge. 

Also recently another student, a 
lower-classman, in a small college, 
expressed the same dissatisfaction 
with his course. A large institution 
was the only hope for a fellow want- 
ing a real education and where in- 
structors and courses were amply 
up-to-date. 

These cases are only typical of 
the problems faced by every person 
in or out of school. In the mills, 
the factories, on the farms, or wher- 
ever men work and exchange goods 
or ideas, it is found the same; good, 
bad, and indifferent. There are good 
employers and bad ones; good work- 
ers and poor workers, good teachers 
and poor teachers; good students and 
poor students. It is a great mass 
of disorganized material in which a 
man must pick out the best and 
mold to his -own purpose. After all 
it doesn't matter so much whether 
or not the other thing, or the other 
person is so perfectably capable, for 
we succeed largely thru our own 
efforts. It seems then that the best 
thing to do after all, is to hitch 
our wagon to a star, climb in, and 
drive on. 



LET'S COOPERATE 

The Crescent, it seems, has been 
a very much neglected sheet during 
the past two months or more. But 
owing to the peculiar circumstances 
of the case, it seems hardly necessary 
to offer apologies. 

The publishing of a college paper 



FRESHMAN GLASS 

Two little Sophomore girls swiped 
three Freshman caps. They were 
rejoicing at the ease and success of 
their escapade — but ah, just wait! 
Silence in the Freshman class does 
not mean inactivity. 

Two Freshie heads were bent to- 
gether in wicked plotting while these 
two Sophomore girls were in the 
gym. Room mates are a nuisance 
to other people sometimes. But 
these Freshies tolled the offending 
room mate outside. Then stealthily, 
one eye on the door, the other on 
the window, they slithered into the 
room and successfully sorting the 
shoes, swiped the left one of each 
pair, then slid hastily thru the door 
and down the hall just in time to 
avoid detection. The same course 
was taken in the other girl's room. 
In both rooms a note was left say- 
ing, "you may exchange the three 
Freshman caps that you now have 
in your possession for your shoes at 

the home." In every other 

room in the Dorm they left a note 
which read, "Don't lend your shoes 
to the Sophomore girls under penalty 
of excommunication." 

Having completed this, the girls 
slipped out to the woods where they 
were joined by a third girl who 
took them up town and treated them 
for a noble deed well done. 

Volley ball was over. The girls 
rushed from the gym to their rooms 
and. found to their dismay that they 
must wear tennis shoes as there was 
not two of a kind of any other pair 
of shoes. So tennis shoes they wore, 
and to dinner t hey went. And 
strange as it may seem, it is rumored 
around town that a pnir of tennis 
shoes even appeared at Ivceum. But 
the next morning two pairs of tennis 
shoes walked down to the 



home, unloaded three green caps and 
carried home five extra shoes. Said 
the shoes to the caps, "you pulled 
a mighty clever stunt." Said the 
caps to the shoes, "you were game, 
nevertheless." 



MRS. HULL GIVES RECITAL 

The recital given November 19 by 
the pupils of Mrs. Hull was a very 
successful one. The students appear- 
ing were Esther Baird, Helen Ran- 
kin, Bertha May Pennington, Helen 
Linton, Doris Dingham, Delia Han- 
ville, Loren Gettman, Leona Free- 
man, Louise Kienle, and Dennis Mc- 
Guire. Recitations were given by 
Delia Hanville. 

Owing to the sudden illness of 
Alexander Hull, the vocal students 
did not appear which caused dis- 
appointment to many. 



S. S. GIRLS MEET 

The daughters of Rebecca Smith 
of the Friends Sunday school met 
in the parlors of the Girls' Dormi- 
tory for a business meeting and 
social hour. 

The daughters and Mrs. Smith 
were met at the door by two old- 
fashioned Quaker ladies. 

The evening was spent in discuss- 
ing plans and telling stories and 
listening to instrumental and vocal 
solos. Refreshments of fruit salad 
and sandwiches were served. 

Everyone declared they had a 
good time. 



LINFIELD T AKE S HARD 

GAME FROM PACIFIC 



(Continued from page one) 

gave them a good shower, when he 
brought his right foot down with 
force in the puddle. George played 
a good game. He's not afraid of 
getting his feet wet. Homer Hester 
hurt his shoulder long toward the 
last of the game and Street took his 
place. Street was crowded for time 
so he played hard while he played, 
stopping Linfield's plays before they 
started. Stanbrough, Hollingsworth 
and Cheniworth have not got to play 
much this year but every night have 
been loyal to the football squad by 
coming out. Next year Pacific col- 
lege hopes to make a clear football 
record and with such a loyal student 
body as ours we feel we can success- 
fully do this. 

The lineup of the teams was as 
follows: 

Pacific Position Linfield 

R. Hester L. E. Proppe 

Winslow L. T. Kannarr 

A. Everest L. G. Manning 
Lienard Center Ankcorn 

Haworth R. G. Marsh 

Sanders Quarter Kratt 

E. Everest R. H. Wilson 
Hanke R. T. Scott 

H. Hester R. E. Wakeman 
Millinger L. H. Konzelman 

Armstrong F. B. Coburn 



TREFIAN 

A very interesting meeting of Tre- 
fian was held in Canyon Hall, No- 
vember 21st. After a short business 
session, the following program was 
given: 

The History of Tref ian . . . Eva Mills 
The Early Initiations . . Retha Tucker 
Quartette. .. .Ard is Michener, Hilma 

Hendrickson, Gwendolyn Hansen, 

Edith Sanderman 
Requirements for Membership... 

Esther Howarth 

Reading Constitution. . .Dilla Tucker 

The new girls reported this pro- 
gram as very interesting and worth 
while. The meeting adjourned after 
a novel rendering by the quartet 
of "Juanita" and "Old Black Joe" 
in combination form. The following 
names were added to the membership 
list: 



WELLS 

FOR 

WESTINGHOUSE BATTERIES 



NEWBERG TRANSFER CO. 

Local and Long Distance 
HAULING 

PHONE WHITE 187 



HOME CASH GROCERY 
Quality and Service 
312 FIRST STREET 



Patronize Crescent Advertisers. 



WE HAVE A FINE LINE OF 

Christmas Cards 

Come ami see them. The 
Price is right 

Newberg Graphic 



FORDS 

WE SELL 'EM 

WE FILL 'EM 

WE FIX 'EM 

NEWBERG MOTOR CO. 



Black 122 Office White 22 

DR. H. C. DIXON 
DENTIST 



CITY GROCERY 
Call Black 231 for Fresh Fruits 
and Vegetables and Your 
Grocery Wants 
714 FIRST STREET 



College Students are Always Wel- 
come at 
THE REXALL STORE 

Lynn B. Ferguson 
PRESCRIPTION DRUGGIST 



GEO. WARD'S BARBER SHOP 

Satisfaction 
Guaranteed 

NEXT TO YAMHILL ELECTRIC 



VISIT THE FAIR 
5c and 10c Store 
WALLACE & SON 

607 First St. Newberg, Ore. 



STUDENTS— 

For the easiest shave 
and most up-to-date 
hair cut, go to 

JAMES McGUIRE 

OPPOSITE )THE POST OFFICE 
V. * 

t * 



PARLOR PHARMACY 

H. A. COOLEY, Prop. 

Ice Cream and Candies 

Kodaks, Cameras and Supplies. 



Patronize Crescent Advertisers. 



An Electric Washing Machine 
Makes LABOR DAY a pleasantry 

YAMHILL ELECTRIC CO. 

"IT SERVES YOU RIGHT" 



Anderson Motor 
Company 

STAR AND 
STUDEB AKER 

Sales and Service 

Associated Oil Products 
GENUINE FORD PARTS 



PERSONALS 

Prof. Hull has been ill the past 
week. 

President Pennington has return- 
ed from a successful trip in the east. 

Esther Haworth and Marie Hester 
spent Sunday, the 18 th, at the dorm. 

Lucille Clough had as her guest 
last week her cousin, Miss Coralie 
Berry of Portland. 

Did you notice the new "down" 
box at the Mac game? Ask Miss 
Lee and Helen Hester. 

Miss Jenelle Vandervert of Willa- 
mette spoke before the Y. W. C. A. 
cabinet November 19. 

Ben Darling returned on Monday 
from Dryden, Washington, where he 
has been during the past two months 

Charlotte Jones, who is a junior 
at the U. of I. this year, hopes to 
return to Pacific again next year. 
P. C. hopes so too. 

Mildred Choate went to Portland 
last Wednesday evening to spend the 
day with her father, Rev. Calvin 
Choate, who returned with her to 
Newberg. 

Tose fortunate enough to see the 
Monmouth game were, "Shorty" Nor. 
dyke .Elsie Allen, Florence Lee, Ruth 
Lee, Helen and Marie Hester and 
Dr. and Mrs. Hester. 

We hear that Miss Lee was ex- 
tremely popular with the football 
team immediately after the ;Mon- 
mouth game. Who would imagine 
that football heroes liked candy. 



WHO'S WHO AT PACIFIC 

STUDENT BODY OFFICERS 
President, Albert Reid; vice presi- 
dent, Florence Lee; secretary, Marie 
Hester; treasurer, Clifton Parrett; 
forensic manager, Royal Gettman; 
treasurer 0. S. A., Emma Fort; treas- 
urer I. O. A. O., Harlln Rinard; yell 
leader, Paul Brown; song leader, 
Helen Nordyke, property manager, 
Y. W. C. A. 
President, Helen Hester; vice 
president, Olive Armstrong; secre- 
tary, Ruth Whitlock; treasurer, Em- 
ma Fort; U. R., Eva Miles; religious 
meeting's committee, Lucille Clough; 
world fellowship committee, Reta 
Hansen; social service committee, 
Nina Johnson; social committee, Hel- 
ma Hendricksen; music committee, 
Olive Terrell. 

Y. M. C. A. 
President, Hubert Armstrong; vice 
president and chairman of religious 
meetings committee, Marion Win- 
slow ; treasurer-chairman finance 
committee, Harlan Rinard; chairman 
of Bible study committee, Virgil Hin- 
shaw; chairm of membership com- 
mittee, Ralph Hester; chairman of 
social committee, Paul Brown. 
CLASS OFFICERS 
Seniors 

President, Eva Miles; secretary 
and treasurer, Lucille Clough. 
Juniors 

President, Royal Gettman; vice 
president, Reta Hansen; secretary. 
Iris Hewitt; treasurer, Mary Elliott; 
chairman social committee, Delight 
Carter. 

'Sophomore 

President, John Chenevert; vice 
president, Paul Brown; secretary, 
Florence Heater; treasurer, Clifton 
Parrett; chairman social committee, 
Helen Nordyke. 

Freshman 

President, Edgar Street, vice pres- 
ident, Zelle Justus; secretary, Esther 
Haworth; treasurer, Marion Win- 
slow; chairman social committee, 
Marie Hester. 

Academy Officers 

President, Dilla Tucker; vice pres.. 
Louise Nelson; secreatry, Ethel Gul- 
ley; treasurer, Bern ice Newhouse; 
faculty advisor, Miss Ruth Lee; 
marshall, Hulda Winslow; social 
chairman, Alice Laudien; Crescent 
reporter, Edith Sanderman. 



Y. W. ENTERTAIN GIRLS 

RESERVE OF HIGH SCHOOL 



Saturday evening the Y. W. girls 
assembled at the college to give the 
Girls Reserve of the high school a 
glorious good time. Did you ever 
try putting a paper bag on your 
right hand and going about intro- 
ducing yourself to others until you 
had completely worn out the bag 
with so much handshaking? The 
girls found that it was an excellent 
way to add many name's to their 
list of acquaintances. 

When everyone began to feel at 
home the girls divided into three 
groups and played games in a sort 
of relay fashion in three rooms. 
Then seven groups were made and 
each group with the aid of news- 
papers dressed up one of their num- 
ber in the most infantile apparel 
possible. When all were ready to 
appear they assembled in room 14 
and awaited the decision of the 
judge. Mr. Michener was brought 
In from the library and the grand 
prize was given i to Bernice Hinshaw; 
each one in that group receiving an 
all-day sucker. 

When each H. S. girl had found a 
partner from the Y. W. everyone 
went up into the chapel where a 
varied and interesting program was 
given. The president of the Y. W. 
gave a speech of welcome and friend- 
ship to the Girls' Reserves. The 
dorm quartet consisting of Polly, 
Bernice, Hilma, and Shorty sang 
twice in their usual entertaining 
way. Dilla Tucker gave a humorous 
reading and was persuaded by the 
audience to give another. Ruth 
Campbell displayed her elocutionary 
powers in "The Cattle Thief." The 
curtain was raised on- three little 
tots who sang and recited for the 
amusement of everyone. 

Hot chocolate and delicious dough- 
nuts were served. Then everyone 
shook hands and said good-night to 
everyone else, and the meeting ad- 
journed until next year. 



TREFIAN INITIATES ' 

What happened? Ask the new 
Trefian girls just what happened, 
and they will tell you about their 
horrible, yet enjoyable experience. 
The girls, donned in gymnasium 
clothes, gathered in the main hall 
of Wood-Mar Hall, Saturday night, 
November 10th, many trembling , 
with fear and others boasting of 
their bravery. Two by two they 
were taken to some place on the 
campus to take the oath of secrecy 
and receive the first part of the 
initiation. What happened? We 
can't exactly tell but by the appear- 
ance of the floor and by the uncom- ' 
fortable expression upon the girls' i 
faces, we judge that they had visit- | 
ed some saw-dust pile. One at a 
time they were taken into Room 14 
to be examined by two prominent 
doctors, namely Dr. F. Heater and 
Dr. M. Elliott. After being thorough- 
ly examined they tested their ability 
to push a bean across the floor with 
their nose. This was the cause of 
many a bruised and scratched nose. 

The girls gladly took the Trefian 
oath which Delia Tucker read. A 
few games were played after which 
dainty refreshments, consisting of 
pumpkin tarts and ice cream were 
served. After th<» new girls had 
cleaned up the building all said good 
night to one another and departed 
for home. 



J. C. PORTER & CO. 
General Merchandise 

Your patronage appreciated 
PHONE BLACK 28 



You Get Your Monev's Worth 

— at the — 

GEM BARBER SHOP 



CITY MEAT MARKET 
"The Home of Good Meats" 
Deliver before and after school 
Phone Red S6 
MOORE & SON 



W. W. HOLLINGSWORTH CO. 

STORE OF QUALITY 



500 First St. 



Newberg, Ore. 



TREFIAN INITIATION 

The Trefians held their initiation 
Saturday evening after the bonfire 
and at 8:30 the new members met 
in Wood-Mar Hall. Two old mem- 
bers accompanied each of the new 
members to the saw dust at the 
north door of the gym. This visit 
seemed to be enjoyed more or less, 
judging from the enthusiastic excla-j 
mations made by some. Ruth Camp- 
bell and Mildred Choate seemed to 
have unusually strong lungs, and 
ought to be valuable additions to 
Trefian. , 

Next the new girls visited the 
office of Doctor Elliott and Doctor 
Heater, where they were examined 
and given suitable medecine for their! 
1 ailments. We cannot account fori 
I Mrs. Michener's unusual fondness for 
I soda, in fact, she liked it so well 
j that she tried to share it with sev- 
I eral others. | 
The girls all passed the doctor's 
examination and were fallowed to 
\ participate in the lima bean race. 
Those who had the longest noses i 
were the most fortunate and finish- 1 
ed in time to watch the slower ones. 
We are very sorry to say that Helen 
Robertson broke the rules of the 
race by using her breath. As a 
punishment for this, she had to take 
the place of the one farthest be- 
hind and finish the race for her. i 
After this the new members took, 
the Trefian pledge and were served I 
refreshments while they gave im- 
promtu speeches. As it is always 
a part of the Initiation that the new 
] members shall clean up after the 
I party, they armed themselves with 
. brooms, brushes, etc., and proceeded 
1 to sweep the floors before going i 
« home. I 



Yours for Service and Quality 

ELECTRIC SHOE SHOP 

JASPER BALES, Proprietor 



A. MORRIS 

OPTICIAN 

JEWELER 



CLARENCE BUTT 
Attorney 

Office second floor Union Block 



BR. TH0S. W. HESTER 

Physician and Surgeon 

Office in Dixon Building 
NEWBERG, -:- OREGON 



Sherlock's Restaurant 

BIG EATS FOR 
LITTLE MONEY 



C J. BREIER COMPANY 

Everything in Men's Furnishings 

at Reasonable Prices 
CLOTHING SHOES 



KIENLE & SONS 
PIANOS 

Musical Merchandise 
MUSIC, STATIONERY, ETC. 
504 First St. Newberg, Ore. 



Patronize Crescent Advertisers. 



NEWBERG BAKERY 

404 First Street 

Best of Bread; Finest Cakes. 
Pies like Mother used to make. 



All Kinds of 
GROCERIES AND CANDY 

— at — 

J. L. VAN BLARICOM'S 
Let us quote you prices 



BOB WALKER 
Shoe Shine Parlor 

Ladies' Suede Shoes a Speciality 

CANDIES AND GUM 
STAGE DEPOT 



A Word 

to the wise is sufficient 
Compare Quality as well as Price 
What vou eat and wear get 

— AT— 

Miller Mercantile Co. 

"Good Goods" 



Newberg 
Restaurant 

The only one that has 



Good 
Waffles 



ROBERT CROUSE, Prop. 



DR. JOHN S. RANKIN 
Physician & Surgeon 
Office Phone Black 171 
Residence Phone Gray 171 
Office over U. S. National Bank 



JOKES c?> 

B. H. — "Seems to me I've spent 
half my life waiting for a man." 

A. R. — "That's nothing, some girls 
spend all their lives waiting for a 
man." 



E. C. BAIRD 
GENERAL MERCHANDISE 

We Appreciate Your Patronage 
Phone Red 37 

Patronize Crescent Advertisers. 

DR. A. M. DAVIS DR. I. R. ROOT 
DENTISTS 

Over Ferguson's Drug Store 
Phone White 38 



20TH CENTURY COFFEE 

Roasted Today 
On your table tomorrow 

20TH CENTURY GROCERY 

702 First St. 



Fussers — "Have you read the 
Minister's Wooing? Better hurry up, 
spring will soon be here." 



Watches Jewelry Clocks 
E. G. RE1D 
Watch and Clock Repairing 

All Work Guaranteed 
906 First St. Newberg, Ore. 



W. H. BEST 

W. W. HOWETT 

PLUMBING AND HEATING 

WATER METERS 



We are sorry to learn that several 
of our students are. troubled with 
neuralgia. Hot applications are 
sometimes alleviating. 



The two magazines we wish to 
call attention to this month are — 
The Historical Outlook and The 
World's Work. It makes us wonder 
about the world tomorrow. 



The Gulley blunderbus 

Broke down the other day, 

They ditched it by the road 
And journeyed on their way. 



v.. 

r 



PEOPLE'S MARKET 
We Deliver 

PHONE BLUE 220 



A. C. SMITH 

Dealer in Leather Goods 
Auto Tops a Speciality 

703 First Street 



EVANS 
PHOTOGRAPHER 
KODAK FINISHING 



Will B. Brooks 
Printer 

410 First St. Phone Black 22 



HOFFMAN STEAM PRESS 
Cleaning Pressing Repairing 

RYGG THE TAILOR 

PHONE BLACK 180 



V. 



v. 



EVANS 
PLUMBING COMPANY 

311 First Street 



ECONOMY CLEANERS 
AND DYERS 

ELGIN VAN BLARICOM 



YELL PRACTICE 

Last Tuesday evening the students 
gathered in the parlors of the Girl's 
Dormitory for yell and song practice. 
Lots of pep was shown by the large 
number which assembled. 

President Pennington told us in 
chapel that if we tore the walls 
down yelling we would have a new 
dormitory. Some kind-hearted folks 
evidently Intend to help the cause. 
They placed a stick of dynamite in 
the field in front of the dorm, cal- 
culated to explode during yell prac- 
tice. It actually exploded some time 
later, but nevertheless it caused lots 
of excitement, even calling out the 
Business Men's Club. 

No one hurt! 



FOOTBALL BANQUET 

(Continued from page one) 



the same men may turn out a win- 
ning team next year. Coach Mich- 
ener deserves creditable mention in 
drilling the team and we know that 
he owes much of his success to 
the encouragement given him by 
Mrs. Michener. 

The team expresses its sincere 
appreciation to Mr. and Mrs. Mich- 
ener, to Mr. and Mrs. Conover, who 
helped so much in making the ban- 
quet possible, and to the college girls 
who served and helped to prepare 
Che delicious meal. 



Mary Elliott was the leader in 
Y. W. on Nov. 21. After quoting 
a beautiful nature psalm, she spoke 
of the mountain top where all the 
petty things of daily life appear 
far below, comparatively insignifi- 
cant. Her figure was based on the 
ascent of Mount Hood which she 
made last summer. 



PACIFIC WINS EASILY 

FROM MONMOUTH TEAM 



(Continued from page one) 



opportunity to star but the line 
deserves great credit for doing their 
work as a line should. The fans 
especially enjoyed watching Phil 
pile up his opponents four at a time. 
Twice during the game Hcmer Hester 
was able to dispose of two players 
and successfully tackle the man with 
the ball behind the line. One of 
these tackles was amusing to the 
sidelines because the runner was 
just in the act of diving over the 
line when Homer hauled his back 
by the hind foot. 

Gus Hanke played a consistant 
game throughout and showed a 
sportsmanlike spirit in spits of some 
trying decisions. 

All of the fellows deserve credit 
for hard fighting in team work and 
individual playing. 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK 
Newberg, Oregon 
KEEP YOUR RESERVE FUNDS WITH US 

INTEREST PAID ON SAVINGS ACCOUNTS 




DR. S. M. WENDT 
Surgeon 

Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat 

Calls answered to your home 
EDWARDS BLDG. NEWBERG 



Ralph W. VanValin 



DENTISTRY 



OVER U. S. BANK 



X-Ray Diagnosis 
GAS ADMINISTERED 



Pacific Students: 



SUPPLIES AND SERVICE AT 

Parker Hardware Co. 



UNITED STATES NATIONAL BANK 

ROLL OF HONOR BANK 
Capital and Surplus $100,000 

Accounts of students, faculty and friends of Pacific College invited 
INTEREST PAID ON SAVINGS 



Graham's Drug Store 

SCHOOL SUPPLIES KODAK FINISHING 

HEADQUARTERS FOR PERIODICALS 



"Rosebud Flour" 

MONEY BACK IF NOT SATISFACTORY 



We are P. C. Boosters 
Larkin-Prince Hardware Co. 

SPORTING GOODS 



CAMPBELL'S 

School Supplies - Lunch - Soft Drinks 

CANDIES 

College Trade Always Appreciated 
NEWBERG, ORE.